Classical 91.5

Women in Music

WXXI Classical 91.5 Presents...Mozart's Sister Online, in partnership with The Virtual Little Theatre and the Empire Film and Media Ensemble.

Miss the live event? You can still enjoy the discussion online here, thanks to the technical and projection staff at The Virtual Little Theatre: 

St. Olaf College

This month Diane Jones highlights some of the most influential female music teachers.  Pictured here is Nadia Boulanger, probably the most powerful influence in the 20th century music.

5/4       Patchwork Quilt, Part XIV  A mix of music written and performed by women.

5/11      Elemental Music  Music of earth, air, fire and water

5/18      Influential Women: Teachers  Women who share their knowledge with a new generation

Jessica Bejarano

You can count them on one hand.  Just hold up one finger.  Among more than 20 of the major U.S. symphony orchestras, only one woman has the top job of principal conductor. But women are making better gains in the nation’s smaller ensembles. Jessica Bejarano is leading the San Francisco Civic Symphony, as well as the path for other women like her trying to shatter gender stereotypes. NewsHour Weekend Special Correspondent Joanne Elgart Jennings reports:

Daniel Dorsa for The New York Times

Things are going amazingly well for 37 year-old American composer Missy Mazzoli.

She was recently appointed the Chicago Symphony Orchestra’s composer in residence, and she has an eagerly anticipated new opera set to premiere later this month.  

In this profile by Zachary Woolfe of the New York Times, she describes growing up in rural Pennsylvania.

Say what you will about beauty pageants, but this one is a winner in the eyes of classical music fans.  On Sunday night in Atlantic City, opera singer and composer Nia Franklin was crowned Miss America.  

Franklin is a native of Winston-Salem, North Carolina who earned her master's degree in music composition from UNC School of the Arts.  She moved to New York after being accepted at the Kenan Fellow program at Lincoln Center Education in Manhattan.

Close Up with Jennifer Higdon - Part I

Jul 31, 2018
J. Henry Fair / http://jenniferhigdon.com/biography.html

Pulitzer Prize and two-time Grammy-winner Jennifer Higdon (b. Brooklyn, NY, December 31, 1962) currently hold the Rock Chair in Composition at The Curtis School of Music. Her works represent a wide range of genres, from orchestral to chamber, to wind ensemble, as well as vocal, choral and opera.

LGBT Artists Through the Ages

Jun 19, 2018
http://www.fscclub.com/history/fame-duelists-e.shtml

As June is LGBT-Pride Month, we here at WXXI 91.5 Classical Radio have been reflecting on how many LGBT (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender) artists have rocked the classical music scene throughout the ages. From composers, to performers, to conductors, so many LGBT people (Here’s a short list: Benjamin Britten, Samuel Barber, Ethyl Smyth, Arnold Schoenberg) have shaped and innovated classical music for the better.

provided

Meet Teryle ("TARE-ril") Watson, a teacher, conductor, and performer who inspires students with her passion and humor.  

Born in Brooklyn, New York, she came to Rochester in 1967 to attend the Eastman School of Music.  Her journey has taken her from the Julliard School in New York to the Royal College of Music in London and back to Rochester where, in 1975, she embarked on a thirty one year career as a music teacher with the Rochester City School District.

The List is Out

Mar 21, 2018
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

Every year, the Library of Congress' Registry honors 25 "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" recordings.  Among the gems on the new list are the soundtrack of The Sound of Music, cellist Yo-Yo Ma, and recordings of music by Christopher Rouse, Steve Reich, Richard Maxfield, Pauline Oliveros.

The RPO's 96th season will include music from the classic repertoire, as well as programming aimed at the family. We sit down with music director Ward Stare and Curt Long, the new CEO.

Our conversation includes the criticism that some orchestras have received for not featuring enough music by women and people of color -- something the RPO says it is addressing this season. Our guests:

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