Classical 91.5

Arts and Culture

thetabernaclechoir.org

The Mormon Tabernacle Choir is dropping "Mormon" and singing under new name, the Tabernacle Choir at Temple Square.

Church President Russell M. Nelson acknowledged that it would be a challenge to undo a centuries-old tradition.   "We're not changing names. We're correcting a name," he said.

Read why here.

A dozen or so people gather in a rehearsal space at the Eastman Community Music School, near the corner of East Avenue and Gibbs Street. They are playing an instrument called the hammered dulcimer, which requires the use of small sticks or hammers to ping against the strings of an instrument which was developed hundreds of years ago.

But except for their teacher, Mitzie Collins, most of these students are not professional musicians, nor do they plan to pursue that career.

As Collins explained, they are just taking her lessons on the instrument because it’s enjoyable. 

“I love adult learners, because they’re not doing it to make anybody happy but them. I would say a certain number of my adult students have wanted to play an instrument but just time and money and things never made that possible.”

These KeyBank Rochester Fringe Festival shows are like chasing lightning bugs across a hillside. For most of the shows, you get one, two, maybe three looks at them. And that’s it. They’re gone.

A classical pianist and teacher at the Hochstein School has found a unique way to conquer her lifelong struggle with performance anxiety.

"The thing is, I love to play the piano,” said Paula Bobb at her home in Brighton. “I love to play the piano...it just fed my soul.”

She loves it so much she was willing to endure years of crippling stage fright every time she performed in public, starting when she was just five-and-a-half years old.

No matter how long or hard she practiced, or how prepared she felt, Paula just could not shake the anxiety.

Russian pianist and composer Sergei Rachmaninoff was stingy with his talent.  The only recordings we have of him playing were produced in studios, under strict controls.  That's why a recently-discovered performance of the artist interpreting his Symphonic Dances is so exciting to classical music afficianados.

The Rochester Fringe Festival is two weeks away and already one show is sparking serious conversation. Lee Wright leads the First Inversion choir and they have a show in the festival dedicated to African American spirituals. But recently, some in the community called out Wright for what they say are anti-black images.

It’s our annual Fringe Festival preview. The 11-day festival includes more than 500 performances. We sit down with the festival’s producer and artists from a range of acts to talk about what’s on stage at this year’s event.

In studio:

We have a conversation about the challenges of bringing the arts to rural areas. Shake on the Lake is a professional Shakespeare touring company based in Silver Lake. The founders created the organization after observing the disparity in arts and cultural opportunities in rural communities. They’re one of a few local organizations that bring theater and the arts to underserved rural groups, including the prison population.

We discuss their work and how it impacts cultural and economic development in the areas they serve. Our guests:

Eight years ago, Jessica Marten – Curator in Charge/Curator of American Art at Rochester’s Memorial Art Gallery – was poking around among the paintings in a museum storage space when a small piece caught her eye.

It was many things. The artist’s medium, egg tempera and gold leaf, suggested medieval paintings, and the illuminated manuscripts of monks. The extensive use of borders is what might be seen on a tapestry. And the central figure looked like an image from Frida Kahlo: A woman in pain, clutching her head. Her eyes are bleeding.

http://mcs.smu.edu/artsresearch2014/arts-vibrancy-2018

The National Center for Arts Research (NCAR) at Southern Methodist University has just released its Top 20 List of Most Vibrant Arts Communities, and Rochester made the list as the 17th most vibrant arts community among large cities.  Mayor Lovely Warren said, “The City of Rochester’s commitment to the arts has landed us on the NCAR’s list for the third time in four years and illustrates our dedication to our citizens and the arts community as a whole.”

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