Classical 91.5

Backstage Pass with Chris Van Hof--1/28 & 2/2/20

Chris Van Hof came to Classical 91.5 as an Arts Leadership Intern from the Eastman School of Music. Shortly thereafter, Chris took the reins of the afternoon hosting shift for Classical 91.5, bringing a new energy to the shift held for more than 30 years by the late Mordecai Lipshutz. Some years later, he left us as our afternoon announcer, and headed back to graduate school. Chris returns to our airwaves as a professor of trombone at Ball State University and a sub/extra for the Indianapolis...

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Recent blog posts

Spotlight on Music Therapy in Rochester

Jan 21, 2020
https://hochstein.org/Expressive-Arts

Music Therapy has been shown to benefit people of all ages and abilities. It can improve cognitive, social, mental, physical and emotional needs. 

An organization in our own community is doing much to provide assistance and programs for those who would benefit from these services. The Expressive Arts Program at The Hochstein School, under the direction of Jennifer Phillips, has been providing services in the Rochester area for more than 40 years. Today we highlight the work they are doing.

Celebrating Sherrill Milnes at 85

Jan 9, 2020
Dario Acosta

A personal tribute, interview, and words from friends 

This week we celebrate the eighty-fifth birthday of the legendary operatic baritone Sherrill Milnes. Born on January 10, 1935 in Downers Grove, Illinois, Sherrill lived his early life on a dairy farm. His mother was the music director of the Methodist church, where Sherrill gleaned his early music education; singing hymns and playing several instruments. His father was the minister. From this grounded place, Sherrill grew up to become the most celebrated and the most recorded American opera singer of his time. To me, he is family.

News from the world of Classical Music

We've been starting this new year off with genres of music you might not listen to, or that you say you're not a fan of — so far, we've covered jazz, country and deep house.

100 years ago, the founders of The Hochstein School set out to provide meaningful opportunities for students to learn and express their creativity. The first students studied piano, violin, and music theory. Since then, Hochstein has expanded its offerings to include many different styles of music and dance.

We'll be highlighting stories from The Hochstein School's past and present throughout the year. Here's one from our colleagues from "What's Good Rochester" - Hochstein dance instructor Kyle Steins shares what dance means to him. 

Half way through this performance of Max Richter's achingly beautiful On The Nature Of Daylight, I looked around our NPR Music office and saw trembling chins and tearful eyes. Rarely have I seen so many Tiny Desk audience members moved in this way. There's something about Max Richter's music that triggers deep emotions.

Harriet Tubman may be the best-known conductor of the Underground Railroad, but a new album highlights another key figure: William Still, who helped nearly 800 enslaved African Americans escape to freedom in the years before the Civil War.

Norwood Pennewell’s adoptive father was dead by the time he was 16 years old, and his adoptive mother was gone a few years later.

Jeff Tyzik speaks of growing up in a dysfunctional home.

When they first set eyes on Garth Fagan, and what he was doing with dance, Pennewell and Tyzik were “blown away.” Independently, both use that phrase. They were college students then, searching for their identities, and they were intimidated.

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On Record Interviews

It's a program of music inspired by times of oppression, filled with themes of resistance. Conductor Fabien Gabel returns to Kodak Hall to guest conduct the Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra and pianist Juho Pohjonen makes his  RPO debut in an evening of Beethoven, Poulenc, and Prokofiev. Julia Figueras sat down and chatted with them about the works, the power of Beethoven, and the joys of French music.

There are journeys we take in life. Sometimes, we go through darkness to find light; sometimes we leave the light and descend into darkness. In the next Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra concerts, we will do both.

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Across the Universe/Jeff Spevak

It is helpful to think of the release of a new Joywave album as a biological function. "I just naturally produce one every several years," lead singer and songwriter Daniel Armbruster says. "I turn it in to the record company and then they decide if they want to release it. And they liked this one, so it's going to be released."

It's kind of like a snake shedding its skin?

"It really does feel like that."

At age 76, Eric Andersen considers himself to be in "The Danger Zone."

"Half the people I knew are not around anymore," he says. "Townes is gone, Lou Reed is gone, Rick Danko is gone, Janis is gone. Joni, almost.

"You can't argue with gravity and health."

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