Classical 91.5

Brenda Tremblay

Classical Morning Host and Producer

Brenda Tremblay bolts out of bed every weekday morning at 4:00 a.m. to present classical music on Classical 91.5 FM, streaming at wxxi.org.   (The broadcast starts at 6:00 a.m. with birdsong, inspired by the BBC.)  She’s an NEA Fellow who’s interviewed musical luminaires such as Renée Fleming, Yo-Yo Ma, and Steve Reich.  She also produces and hosts the RPO radio concerts and other local productions, and works with the Center for Public Affairs to create arts and cultural coverage for all media services.  Her productions have earned three Gracies from the Association of Women in Radio and Television, many AP awards, and a national Gabriel Award. 

Away from the studio, Brenda serves as Music Director at St. Luke's Episcopal Church in Brockport, New York.  She loves to sing.  She’s performed with choirs in Carnegie Hall, Westminster Abbey, and in the Forbidden City Concert Hall in Beijing.  In Rochester, some of her best musical memories have been made with friends in the Rochester Oratorio Society and Madrigalia.

The University of Rochester

City newspaper writer Daniel Kushner writes about a weathered book of 17 songs which includes the “Farewell Song of Frederick Douglass,” recently acquired by the University of Rochester.  The song's music was written by  English composer and abolitionist Julia Griffiths who met Douglass in England in 1847.  It could be the only copy in the United States.

Weekday mornings

Aug 17, 2018
Armey/7-themes

After the dawn chorus and NPR news at 6:00 a.m., enjoy recordings from the WXXI library and brief news updates.  

This week’s Mystery Piece at 6:40 a.m. will test you on how much you know about Leonard Bernstein.

Monday, August 20

The Knights play Schubert.  The Eastman Wind Ensemble underscores Wynton Marsalis in a winsome spiritual.  After 9:00 a.m. we’ll break out an historic recording of Leonard Bernstein conducting Schumann’s Manfred Overture.

Tuesday, August 21

The Answer is "Yes"

Aug 17, 2018
By Jack Mitchell, CC

The impact of Leonard Bernstein's passion and intelligence still ripples through our lives.  That's why we're spending so much time reflecting on him and his influence on how we listen to music.

Got five minutes?  Reacquaint yourself with his ideas by watching the short video below.  It's a kind of musical manifesto recorded in front of a live audience at Harvard University.  Bernstein quotes Keats, answers Charles Ives' "Unanswered Question," and argues that music springs from the earth itself.

University of Rochester

In this excellent guide to listening, writer and critic Anne Midgette (pronounced "mid-JET") offers a fresh perspective on the diverse wonders of classical music.

provided

His cello has floated to islands and scaled mountains.  Its sound has echoed across remote lakes and dense pine forests.

Brian Donat is The Adirondack Cellist, and he's performed on wild peaks, in hunting cabins, and on lakeside docks.

Nina Cochran, The Berkshire Eagle

It's a fact. 

Most classical music professionals in major symphony orchestras around the country are white, according to the League of American Orchestras.   In this story from NBC news, cellist Nathaniel Taylor reflects on how that reality is affecting his career.

In this episode of On Being, host Krista Tippett interviews cellist Yo-Yo Ma about his work decoding musical creations across time and space.

"In his art, Yo-Yo Ma resists fixed boundaries, and would like to rename classical music just 'music' — born in improvisation, and traversing territory as vast and fluid as the world we inhabit. In this generous and intimate conversation, he shares his philosophy of curiosity about life, and of performance as hospitality."

Yes, You Can

Jun 19, 2018
Hochstein School of Music & Dance

Let's talk about your voice.  Your singing voice. 

Do you like it? 

Has someone ever told you shouldn't sing?  

According to The Huffington Post, about 85 percent of us have been actively discouraged from singing out loud by the very people (parents, teachers, or friends) who perhaps should encourage all forms of self-expression.

Brenda Tremblay

You don't have to journey far to view fascinating musical instruments on display.

In Alfred, this summer, for example, see and touch Vladimir Horowitz's own Steinway piano, #314503, now known simply as CD 503, on its tour throughout North America during Alfred University’s upcoming MostArts Festival, scheduled for July 8-14th.

Creative Commons

Guest conductor Christopher Warren-Green led the Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra and Rochester Oratorio Society in a performance of Handel's Messiah in December of 2016.

The maestro is no stranger to the British royal family.

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