Classical 91.5

Arts

General arts & cultural NEWS

LEN LEVASSEUR

This weekend, hundreds of musicians and music lovers will gather in Rochester for the 2018 Organ Historical Society (OHS) Convention. The OHS began in 1956 as a small group of young musicians who met in New York City to talk about locating and preserving historic pipe organs in the city. Since then, the society has grown from that small group to an international organization.

http://mcs.smu.edu/artsresearch2014/arts-vibrancy-2018

The National Center for Arts Research (NCAR) at Southern Methodist University has just released its Top 20 List of Most Vibrant Arts Communities, and Rochester made the list as the 17th most vibrant arts community among large cities.  Mayor Lovely Warren said, “The City of Rochester’s commitment to the arts has landed us on the NCAR’s list for the third time in four years and illustrates our dedication to our citizens and the arts community as a whole.”

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His cello has floated to islands and scaled mountains.  Its sound has echoed across remote lakes and dense pine forests.

Brian Donat is The Adirondack Cellist, and he's performed on wild peaks, in hunting cabins, and on lakeside docks.

Fifty years ago, a group of six guys walked on a London stage to perform for the first time as The King's Singers. They were choral scholars and graduates from King's College, part of England's venerable Cambridge University.

It's as if the pianos were haunted. Somewhere about midway through this Tiny Desk, as Icelandic composer Ólafur Arnalds performed on his electronic keyboard, two upright pianos were playing lilting melodies behind him, absent any performer at the keys. And yet these "ghosts," along with Ólafur's band of strings and percussion, put together some of the most beautiful music I've heard at the Tiny Desk, made all the more mysterious through its presentation.

Icelandic composer Ólafur Arnalds was in a hotel lobby somewhere in Asia when he first saw a modern version of a player piano. This particular one was tapping out The Beatles' "Yesterday."

Nina Cochran, The Berkshire Eagle

It's a fact. 

Most classical music professionals in major symphony orchestras around the country are white, according to the League of American Orchestras.   In this story from NBC news, cellist Nathaniel Taylor reflects on how that reality is affecting his career.

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